Slow-K, potassium chloride extended-release tablets USP, is a sugar-coated (not enteric-coated) tablet for oral administration, containing 600 mg of potassium chloride (equivalent to 8 mEq) in a wax matrix. This formulation is intended to provide an extended-release of potassium from the matrix to minimize the likelihood of producing high, localized concentrations of potassium within the gastrointestinal tract.

Slow-K is an electrolyte replenisher. Its chemical name is potassium chloride, and its structural formula is KCI. Potassium chloride USP is a white, granular powder or colorless crystals. It is odorless and has a saline taste. Its solutions are neutral to litmus. It is freely soluble in water and insoluble in alcohol.

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  • Slow-K
  • Applies to potassium chloride: controlled-release tablets, extended-release capsules, extended-release tablets, microencapsulated

    Other dosage forms:

    injection solution
    oral liquid
    powder
    Check with your doctor if any of these most COMMON side effects persist or become bothersome:

    Diarrhea; gas; nausea; stomach discomfort; vomiting.

    Seek medical attention right away if any of these SEVERE side effects occur while taking potassium chloride (the active ingredient contained in Slow-K)
    Severe allergic reactions (rash; hives; itching; difficulty breathing; tightness in the chest; swelling of the mouth, face, lips, or tongue); black, tarry stools; chest pain; irregular heartbeat; listlessness; numbness or tingling in your skin, lips, hands, or feet; severe nausea or vomiting; stomach pain or swelling; unusual confusion or anxiety; unusual muscle weakness or paralysis; vomit that looks like coffee grounds; weak or heavy legs.
  • The usual dietary intake of potassium by the average adult is 50-100 mEq per day. Potassium depletion sufficient to cause hypokalemia usually requires the loss of 200 or more mEq of potassium from the total body store. Dosage must be adjusted to the individual needs of each patient. The dose for the prevention of hypokalemia is typically in the range of 20 mEq per day. Doses of 40-l00 mEq per day or more are used for the treatment of potassium depletion. Dosage should be divided if more than 20 mEq per day is given, such that no more than 20 mEq is given in a single dose. One Slow-K tablet provides 8 mEq of potassium chloride. Slow-K should be taken with meals and with a glass of water or other liquid. This product should not be taken on an empty stomach because of its potential for gastric irritation