Oregano is used for respiratory tract disorders such as coughs, asthma, croup, and bronchitis. It is also used for gastrointestinal (GI) disorders such as heartburn and bloating. Other uses include treating menstrual cramps, rheumatoid arthritis, urinary tract disorders including urinary tract infections (UTIs), headaches, and heart conditions.

The oil of oregano is taken by mouth for intestinal parasites, allergies, sinus pain, arthritis, cold and flu, swine flu, earaches, and fatigue. It is applied to the skin for skin conditions including acne, athlete’s foot, oily skin, dandruff, canker sores, warts, ringworm, rosacea, and psoriasis; as well as for insect and spider bites, gum disease, toothaches, muscle pain, and varicose veins. Oregano oil is also used topically as an insect repellent.

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  • Oregano
  • Pregnancy and breast-feeding: Oregano is POSSIBLY UNSAFE when taken by mouth in medicinal amounts during pregnancy. There is concern that oregano in amounts larger than food amounts might cause miscarriage. Not enough is known about the safety of oregano when used in medicinal amounts while nursing.

    Bleeding disorders: Oregano might increase the risk of bleeding in people with bleeding disorders.

    Allergies: Oregano can cause reactions in people allergic to Lamiaceae family plants, including basil, hyssop, lavender, marjoram, mint, and sage.

    Diabetes: Oregano might lower blood sugar levels. People with diabetes should use oregano cautiously.

    Surgery: Oregano might increase the risk of bleeding. People who use oregano should stop 2 weeks before surgery.
  • BY MOUTH: For intestinal parasites: 200 mg of oil of oregano three times daily for 6 weeks.