Hepatitis B immune globulin is made from human plasma containing proteins that protect against the type B form of hepatitis (inflammation of the liver).

Hepatitis B immune globulin is used to prevent hepatitis B in people receiving a liver transplant, and in babies born to mothers infected with hepatitis B. It is also used to prevent hepatitis B in people who have been exposed to hepatitis B through contaminated blood products, sexual contact with an infected person, or living in a home with an infected person.

Hepatitis B immune globulin is not a vaccine. Therefore it will not provide long-term protection from hepatitis B. For long-term protection you must receive a hepatitis B vaccine such as Engerix-B, Recombivax HB, or Twinrix.

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  • HepaGam B, HepaGam B NovaPlus, Hyperhep B, Nabi-HB
  • Rare
    Blurred vision
    confusion
    dizziness, faintness, or lightheadedness when getting up suddenly from a lying or sitting position
    sweating
    unusual tiredness or weakness
    Incidence not known
    Chills
    cough
    difficult or labored breathing
    difficulty with swallowing
    dizziness
    fast heartbeat
    fever
    hives
    itching
    puffiness or swelling of the eyelids or around the eyes, face, lips, or tongue
    shortness of breath
    skin rash
    tightness in the chest
    wheezing
    Some hepatitis b immune globulin side effects may not need any medical attention. As your body gets used to the medicine these side effects may disappear. Your health care professional may be able to help you prevent or reduce these side effects, but do check with them if any of the following side effects continue, or if you are concerned about them:

    More common
    Back pain
    general feeling of discomfort
    headache
    muscle aches or pain
    nausea
    pain at the injection site
    Less common
    Abdominal or stomach cramping
    burning, heat, and redness at the injection site
    diarrhea
    feeling as if you are going to vomit
    joint pain
    Incidence not known
    Bleeding, blistering, burning, coldness, discoloration of the skin, feeling of pressure, hives, infection, inflammation, itching, lumps, numbness, pain, rash, redness, scarring, soreness, stinging, swelling, tenderness, tingling, ulceration, or warmth at the injection site
    cold sweats
    feeling cold
    flu-like symptoms
    upper abdominal or stomach pain
  • (human hepatitis b virus immune globulin) injection