Hyssop is a plant. The parts that grow above ground are used to make medicine.

Hyssop is used for digestive and intestinal problems including liver and gallbladder conditions, intestinal pain, intestinal gas, colic, and loss of appetite. It is also used for respiratory problems including coughs, the common cold, respiratory infections, sore throat, and asthma.

Other uses include urinary tract infection (UTI), poor circulation, HIV/AIDS, and menstrual cramps.

Some people use hyssop as a gargle; in baths to cause sweating; and on the skin for treating skin irritations, burns, bruises, and frostbite.

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  • Hyssop
  • Pregnancy and breast-feeding: It is UNSAFE to use hyssop during pregnancy because it might cause the uterus to contract or start menstruation. These effects could lead to a miscarriage.

    It’s not known whether hyssop is safe to use during breast-feeding. Stay on the safe side and avoid use.

    Children: It’s UNSAFE to give hyssop to children. Convulsions were reported in a child who took 2-3 drops of hyssop oil over several days.

    Seizures: If you have a history of having seizures, don’t use hyssop. It might trigger seizures or make them worse.
  • The appropriate dose of hyssop depends on several factors such as the user's age, health, and several other conditions. At this time there is not enough scientific information to determine an appropriate range of doses for hyssop. Keep in mind that natural products are not always necessarily safe and dosages can be important. Be sure to follow relevant directions on product labels and consult your pharmacist or physician or other healthcare professional before using.