Ery-Tab contains antibiotic, a macrolide antibiotics. Macrolide antibiotics slow the expansion of, or generally kill, sensitive bacterium by reducing the assembly of necessary proteins required by the bacterium to survive.

Ery-Tab is employed to treat or forestall many alternative forms of infections caused by bacterium.

Ery-Tab may additionally be used for functions unlisted during this medication guide.

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  • E.E.S. Granules, E.E.S.-400 Filmtab, EryPed 200, EryPed 400, Ery-Tab, Erythrocin Stearate Filmtab, PCE Dispertab
  • Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction to Ery-Tab: hives; difficult breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

    Call your doctor at once if you have:

    diarrhea that is watery or bloody;
    headache with chest pain and severe dizziness, fainting, fast or pounding heartbeats;
    hearing problems (rare);
    liver problems--nausea, upper stomach pain, itching, tired feeling, loss of appetite, dark urine, clay-colored stools, jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes); or
    severe skin reaction--fever, sore throat, swelling in your face or tongue, burning in your eyes, skin pain, followed by a red or purple skin rash that spreads (especially in the face or upper body) and causes blistering and peeling.
    Older adults may be more likely to have serious side effects from Ery-Tab, including hearing loss, or a life-threatening fast heart rate.

    Common Ery-Tab side effects may include:

    mild diarrhea; or
    nausea, vomiting, stomach pain, loss of appetite.
  • Adults The usual dose is 250 mg four times daily in equally spaced doses. The 333 mg tablet is recommended if dosage is desired every 8 hours. If twice-a-day dosage is desired, the recommended dose is 500 mg every 12 hours. Dosage may be increased up to 4 g per day according to the severity of the infection. However, twice-a-day dosing is not recommended when doses larger than 1 g daily are administered. Children Age, weight, and severity of the infection are important factors in determining the proper dosage. The usual dosage is 30 to 50 mg/kg/day, in equally divided doses. For more severe infections, this dose may be doubled but should not exceed 4 g per day. In the treatment of streptococcal infections of the upper respiratory tract (e.g., tonsillitis or pharyngitis), the therapeutic dosage of erythromycin should be administered for at least ten days. The American Heart Association suggests a dosage of 250 mg of erythromycin orally, twice a day in long-term prophylaxis of streptococcal upper respiratory tract infections for the prevention of recurring attacks of rheumatic fever in patients allergic to penicillin and sulfonamides.4