Clolar (clofarabine) may be a cancer medication that interferes with the expansion of cancer cells and slows their growth and unfold within the body.

Clolar is employed to treat acute lymphocytic leukemia (a style of blood cancer) in kids and young adults up totwenty one years previous.

Clolar is typically given once alternative cancer medicines are tried while not undefeated treatment.

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  • Clolar
  • Get emergency medical help if you have any signs of an allergic reaction to Clolar: hives; difficult breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

    A rare but serious side effect of Clolar is called capillary leak syndrome. Call your doctor right away if you have signs of this condition, which may include: stuffy or runny nose followed by weakness or tired feeling, and sudden swelling in your arms, legs and other parts of the body.

    Call your doctor at once if you have:

    diarrhea that is watery or bloody;
    bloody or tarry stools, coughing up blood or vomit that looks like coffee grounds;
    painful or difficult urination;
    pain, redness, numbness, and peeling skin on the palms of your hands or the soles of your feet;
    a light-headed feeling, like you might pass out;
    severe skin reaction--fever, sore throat, swelling in your face or tongue, burning in your eyes, skin pain, followed by a red or purple skin rash that spreads (especially in the face or upper body) and causes blistering and peeling;
    signs of infection--fever, chills, cold or flu symptoms, unusual weakness, mouth and throat ulcers, swollen gums, pain when swallowing, pale skin, easy bruising or bleeding (nosebleeds, bleeding gums), skin sores, rapid and shallow breathing, fainting;
    signs of a liver problem--sudden swelling in your mid-section, jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes); or
    signs of tumor cell breakdown--lower back pain, blood in your urine, little or no urinating; numbness or tingly feeling around your mouth; muscle weakness or tightness; fast or slow heart rate, weak pulse, feeling short of breath; confusion.
    Common Clolar side effects may include:

    fever, sore throat, mouth sores;
    nausea, vomiting, diarrhea;
    headache, feeling tired or anxious;
    mild itching or skin rash; or
    flushing (warmth, redness, or tingly feeling).
  • Usual Adult Dose for Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia: Less than 22 years: Initial Dose: 52 mg/m2 by intravenous infusion over 2 hours daily for 5 consecutive days Treatment cycles are repeated following recovery or return to baseline organ function, approximately every 2 to 6 weeks. Subsequent cycles should begin no sooner than 14 days from day 1 of the previous cycle. Subsequent cycles may be administered when the ANC is greater than or equal to 750/mm3. Greater than 22 years: Not approved for use by the FDA. Usual Pediatric Dose for Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia: Less than 1 year: Not approved for use by the FDA. Greater than 1 year: Initial Dose: 52 mg/m2 by intravenous infusion over 2 hours daily for 5 consecutive days Treatment cycles are repeated following recovery or return to baseline organ function, approximately every 2 to 6 weeks. Subsequent cycles should begin no sooner than 14 days from day 1 of the previous cycle. Subsequent cycles may be administered when the ANC is greater than or equal to 750/mm3.